Labyrinth at the Anglican Cathedral Liverpool

Chartres Labyrinth replica at the Anglican Cathedral Liverpool
Chartres Labyrinth replica at the Anglican Cathedral Liverpool. The canvas 11 circuit Chartres replica Labyrinth was laid out at the Cathedral by Sarah Harrison and Eileen Wiggins.

What is a Labyrinth and what can it be used for?

The Labyrinth is an ancient symbol of balance and wholeness.
Walking a labyrinth will quiet the mind - bringing you to a place of calmness
where you can elevate consciousness, connect with higher guidance,
receive answers and facilitate physical and/or emotional healing.

Labyrinths have long been used as meditation and prayer tools.
They have been associated with ancient pilgrimage routes and rituals of self-discovery.
They have been worn as forms of protection and ornamentation,
and they were often carved on doorways to bless a dwelling place.

When I mention the Labyrinth most people think of a maze.

A labyrinth is not a maze. A maze is like a puzzle to be solved.
It has twists, turns, and dead ends, It is a left brain task that requires
you to be logical to find the correct path into the maze and out.

With a maze many choices must be made, and an active mind is needed
to solve the problem of finding the center.

A labyrinth has only one path, the way in is the way out.
There are no dead ends and the path leads you to the center and out again.

A Labyrinth is a right brain task that requires intuition, creativity, and imagination.

With a labyrinth there is only one choice to be made, the choice is to enter or not.

There is no right or wrong way to walk a labyrinth,
You only have to enter and follow the path.
However, your walk can encompass a variety of attitudes.
It may be joyous or somber, It may be thoughtful or prayerful,
You may use it as a walking meditation.

"There are so many ways to walk a Labyrinth
Each unique as the people who come to walk it"

Boyne Valley Private Day Tours

Boyne Valley Tours Pick up and return to your accommodation or cruise ship. Suggested day tour: Newgrange World Heritage site, 10th century High Crosses at Monasterboice, Hill of Tara the seat of the High Kings of Ireland and the Hill of Slane where St. Patrick let a Paschal fire in 433  More ...